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PIELC 2015 Brochure

PIELC 2015 Brochure Addendum

PIELC 2015 Registration Form

“Changing Currents” expresses an awareness that the physical currents of our planet are shifting and that we must alter our human patterns to adapt for a better future. Actions of the past set in motion the drastic changes we are experiencing today. At the same time our actions today will deeply affect our world’s future. The currents that drive our climate system are changing and causing unprecedented changes to human and biotic communities across the globe. But, armed with an awareness of these changes, we can mobilize the social currency needed to change currents and set humanity on the path to resiliency. This year’s conference will provide an opportunity to challenge each other and discuss solutions and strategies for how we may move forward in confronting the world of today with an eye towards tomorrow’s reality.
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PIELC 2015: Changing Currents – March 5-8, 2015 – University of Oregon School of Law, Eugene, Oregon, USA


Western Environmental Law Update Reduces Carbon Footprint

Eugene, Ore. — (March 4, 2015) – Land Air Water is reducing its carbon footprint by discontinuing the printed form of the Western Environmental Law Update (WELU) while maintaining its online presence.

WELU is an annual publication of short articles detailing recent developments in environmental and natural resource law and their effect on the West. The pieces are all student written and may be written specifically for WELU or adopted from papers used to satisfy class or graduation requirements.

Volume 1 of the 2015 WELU we be available online starting Friday, March 6, 2015. The update can be found at http://pielc.org/western-environmental-law-update/.

The update is currently accepting submissions for Volume 2 until April 3rd. Those interested in publication should write an article which focuses on pertinent, timely, legal issues affecting the environment on a local, regional, or international level.

The submission should be between 1000 and 2500 words long. Citation format should follow Blue Book or ALWD Citation Manual and should be located in endnotes.

For additional details, please contact Jesse Hardval at jhardval@uoregon.edu.


Janelle Orsi to Keynote PIELC 2015

Janelle Orsi

Photo from http://www.janelleorsi.com/

EUGENE, Ore. – (March 4, 2015) – Janelle Orsi will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Janelle Orsi is a lawyer, advocate, writer, and cartoonist focused on cooperatives, the sharing economy, urban agriculture, shared housing, local currencies, and community-supported enterprises. She is Co-founder and Executive Director of the Sustainable Economies Law Center (SELC), which facilitates the growth of more sustainable and localized economies through education, research, and advocacy. Janelle has also worked in private law practice at the Law Office of Janelle Orsi, focusing on sharing economy law since 2008.

Janelle is the author of “Practicing Law in the Sharing Economy,” and co-author of “The Sharing Solution: How to Save Money, Simplify Your Life & Build Community,” a practical and legal guide to cooperating and sharing resources of all kinds. In 2010, Janelle was profiled by the American Bar Association as a Legal Rebel, an attorney who is “remaking the legal profession through the power of in- novation.” In 2012, Janelle was one of 100 people listed on The (En)Rich List, which names individuals “whose contributions enrich paths to sustainable futures.”

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


Severine von Tscharner Fleming to Keynote PIELC 2015

Severine von Tscharner Fleming

EUGENE, Ore. – (March 4, 2015) – Severine von Tscharner Fleming will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Severine is a farmer, activist, and organizer based in the Champlain Valley of New York. She is founder and director of The Greenhorns, a grassroots cultural organization with the mission to promote, recruit and support a growing movement of young farmers and ranchers in America. She is also a board member of the Schumacher Center for a New Economics, which sponsors The Agrarian Trust, a new initiative working to build a national network, tools, templates, and pilot projects to support new farmers with land access and opportunity. Severine is founder and organizer of Farmhack, an open-source community for farm innovation, which helps farmers connect, design, and sell appropriate, adaptable tools for sustainable farm systems. She is editor-in-chief of The 2013 New Farmers Almanac.

Severine attended Pomona College and University of California at Berkeley, where she graduated in 2008 with a B.S. in Conservation/AgroEcology. She co- founded the Pomona Organic Farm, UC Berkeley’s Society for Agriculture and Food Ecology, and the National Young Farmers Coalition.

Severine also produces organic pork, rabbit, goose, duck, herbs, and teas, at Smithereen Farm in Essex, NY.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


PIELC 2015 to Feature Bill McKibben

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 26, 2015)—Bill McKibben will give a keynote presentation remotely (via video) at the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon.

Bill McKibben is an author and environmentalist. His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages. He is founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement.

The Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he was the 2013 winner of the Gandhi Prize and the Thomas Merton Prize, and holds honorary degrees from 18 colleges and universities; Foreign Policy named him to their inaugural list of the world’s 100 most important global thinkers, and the Boston Globe said he was “probably America’s most important environmentalist.” A former staff writer for the New Yorker, he writes frequently a wide variety of publications around the world, including the New York Review of Books, National Geographic, and Rolling Stone. He lives in the mountains above Lake Champlain with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern.

Bill McKibbin

 

 

 

 

 

 


PIELC 2015 to Feature Cyril Scott

President Cyril Scott (second from right) at the People’s Climate March in New York City.

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 26, 2015)–Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will host Cyril Scott, President of the Rosebud Lakota Sioux, as a keynote speaker and panelist.

President Scott was born and raised on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.  Upon graduating from high school, he travelled around the country, working in the private sector.  In 2005, he was elected to the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council as a representative for the Antelope District.  In 2014, President Scott was elected as president of the Tribal Council.  In his acceptance speech, President Scott said to the Rosebud Public: “I promised the people of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe ‘sustainable economic development’ and it’s a promise that I aim to keep!  Without a local, tribally-driven, self-sustaining economy our people, our elders and youth will always be subjected to the federal government in a bad way.”

In pursuit of this promise, President Scott and his community are actively engaged in opposing the Keystone XL Pipeline.  In a November article President Scott proclaimed, “The House has now signed our death warrants and the death warrants of our children and grandchildren. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe will not allow this pipeline through our lands.”

President Scott will appear on the panel, “Indigenous Resistance of the Keystone XL,” which will share the Rosebud Tribe’s efforts to fight the pipeline development.  Paula Antoine will join President Scott from the Rosebud Tribe on the panel.  She is the coordinator of the Sicangu Oyate Land Office and a founding member of Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, Shielding the People, a project of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe which established the Sicangu Iyuksa Wicoti (Rosebud Spiritual Camp) on March 29, 2015 in opposition of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline.  Tara Houska is a citizen of Couchiching First Nation and a tribal rights attorney in the Washington D.C. office of Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker LLP.

Although President Obama has vetoed Congress’ Keystone XL bill, the permit for the pipeline looms in the State Department and the permit for the construction of the portion of the pipeline through South Dakota is up for renewal this year.  The Rosebud Sioux Tribe will participate in an evidentiary hearing before the Public Utilities Commission of South Dakota, scheduled May 5-8, 2015. Comments on the Keystone XL pipeline can be submitted to puc@state.sd.us or PUC, 500 E. Capitol Ave., Pierre, SD 57501.


PIELC 2015 to Feature Rugemeleza Nshala

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 25, 2015)– Rugemeleza Nshala will give a keynote address at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference at the University of Oregon.

rugemeleza Nshala

Photo credit: www.elaw.org

Nshala is the co-founder of Lawyers’ Environmental Action Team (LEAT), the first public interest environmental law organization in Tanzania, where he served as President and Executive Director from 1994-2003.

In 2002, LEAT represented a group of small scale miners in Bulyanhulu who were forcibly evicted from their mines by the Tanzanian police. During the eviction, roughly 65 miners are alleged to have been buried alive. Nshala was charged with sedition for speaking out against the government’s human rights abuses.

In 2013, LEAT helped communities in Ukonga-Mazizini win an order from the Ministry of the Environment to close a polluting abattoir. LEAT brought a case against the National Environmental Management Council (NEMC) for its failure to enforce the Environmental Management Act of 2004, Tanzania’s framework environmental law, against polluting industries, including factories, mines, municipal authorities, and cut flower farms.

Recently, Nshala has been working on behalf of communities fighting extractive industries in East Africa. He presented his expertise at the Law Society of Kenya’s Annual Conference in September 2014.

Nshala has a L.L.M. and a Doctorate in Juridical Sciences in International Investment Law from Harvard Law School and a Masters of Environmental Management from Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He has researched and written widely on human rights, wildlife, and environmental protection.

Changing Currents: Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015 will take place on March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


PIELC 2015 to Feature Wahleah Johns

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 23, 2015)—Wahleah Johns is joining the lineup of keynote speakers at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Wahleah is a fouWahleahJohnsnding member and the Solar Project Manager at Black Mesa Water Coalition. Black Mesa Water Coalition advocates for environmental justice and sustainable development on the Navajo Nation.

Wahleah grew up atop Black Mesa on Navajo lands in northeastern Arizona, where Peabody Energy ran what was the largest strip-mining operation on Indian land in the country. The mine drew three million gallons of water per day to pipe its coal slurry from Hopi to Navajo country and then across state lines to a generating station in Nevada.

Angered by the fossil fuel industry’s exploitation of their land and water, a group of students at Northern Arizona University founded Black Mesa Water Coalition in 2001. Wahleah Johns became co-director of the coalition as they launched a campaign to halt environmental degradation on tribal land and replace extractive industries with sustainable alternatives.

In July 2009, the Navajo became the first American Indian nation to enact green jobs legislation, aimed at democratizing tribal decision-making and speeding the transition to a more sustainable future. Presently, Wahleah is leading an initiative to transition Black Mesa’s reclaimed mining lands into solar farms.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


 

PIELC 2015 to Feature Derrick Christopher Evans

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 14, 2015)—Derrick Evans will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015, held at the University of Oregon.

Derrick Evans

Derrick Christopher Evans is a sixth-generation native of coastal Mississippi’s historic African-American community of Turkey Creek, founded in 1866. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Boston College, where he taught civil rights history as an adjunct professor from 1992 to 2005. Evans also taught middle-school American history and social studies in the Boston public school system from 1991 to 2001 and taught history and African-American studies at Roxbury Community College. In 1997, Evans co-founded Epiphany School, a full-service and tuition-free independent middle school for low-income children and families from Boston neighborhoods.

Evans is the co-founder of the Gulf Coast Fund for Community Renewal and Ecological Health, which directs financial, technical and collegial support to grassroots community groups addressing the region’s challenges of poverty, racism, gender inequality and environmental destruction. He is also the co-founder of Turkey Creek Community Initiatives, which works to conserve and restore the culture and ecology of the Turkey Creek community and watershed.


 

PIELC 2015 to Feature Kathleen Dean Moore

EUGENE, Ore. –(February 13, 2015)– Dr. Kathleen Dean Moore will give a keynote address at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference at the University of Oregon.

KDMMoore is a philosopher, writer, and activist who inspires people to protect the natural world with both head and heart. She is Distinguished Professor Emerita of philosophy at Oregon State University (OSU), where she helps students explore the ethical dimensions of environmental problems. She has written books reflecting on the depths of human experience and the intimacy of our relationships with nature, including “Holdfast: at Home in the Natural World” and “Riverwalking: Reflections on Moving Water.” Her most recent work, “Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril” is a collection of environmental wisdom by revered figures from the Dalai Lama to Gus Speth to E.O. Wilson. Moore is exquisitely skilled at weaving poetry with principle and infusing reason with care as she exudes a love of place for her home in Oregon and on the earth.

Moore is the co-founder and Senior Fellow of the Spring Creek Project at OSU, which brings together environmental scientists, philosophers, and writers outdoors in iconic Northwest landscapes to explore the many varied ways of understanding humans’ relationships with nature.

Moore gave the keynote address at the University of Oregon’s Earth Week celebration in 2014. She captivated an audience with her conversational talk entitled, “When Your House is on Fire: On Finding the Moral Courage to Fight for Freedom From Fossil Fuels.”

Changing Currents: Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015 will take place on March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


 

PIELC 2015 to Feature Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez

EUGENE, Ore. –(January 22, 2014)– Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Xiuhtezcatl Martinez is a 14-year-old environmental activist from Boulder, Colorado, who came into the world through the Aztec culture on his father’s side and environmental activism on his mother’s side. Since age six, he has been publicly speaking and advocating for real action on climate change.

Xiuhetzcatl Roske-Martinez

Xiuhtezcatl is the youth director of Earth Guardians, a non-profit environmental organization that is committed to protecting the water, air, earth, and atmosphere. He was one of the youngest speakers at the 2012 Rio+20 United Nations Summit in Rio, Brazil.

His work has taken him from advocating for climate recovery to the Supreme Court of the United States through his involvement with Our Children’s Trust (www.ourchildrenstrust.org) to working with members of the Boulder City Council and local county commissioners to encourage a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Xiuhtezcatl and his brother, Itzcuauhtli Roske-Martinez, perform using original songs, rap, and dance to promote social activism, positive empowerment, and disseminate information to pass the energy forward to the next generations of concerned, caring, and creative people.

Xiuhtezcatl has helped to found International Earth Guardian Crews that work in Africa, India, Australia, Brazil, and Europe. He is passionate to spread his message of hope, inspiration, and the importance of acting now to avoid further damage to ecosystems.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.

 


PIELC 2015 to Feature Amy Goodman

EUGENE, Ore. –(Jan. 15, 2015)—Amy Goodman will give a keynote presentation at the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon March 5 – 8, 2015.

A widely renowned independent journalist, Amy Goodman is host and executive producer of Democracy Now! Amy co-founded Democracy Now! in 1996 after over a decade of work with Pacifica Radio station WBAI of New York City.

DSC_8091Goodman is dedicated to reporting issues that corporate media chooses to ignore or marginalize. Her work informs activists and the public with critical intelligence about the array of environmental crises of today. In her words, Democracy Now! fills a “huge niche” created by mainstream media’s “knowing so little about so much.” Democracy Now! regularly covers issues related to climate change and the climate movement.

As an investigative journalist, Goodman produced the documentary “Drilling and Killing: Chevron and Nigeria’s Oil Dictatorship” about a conflict between the military and protestors of Nigeria and Chevron’s environmental and human rights abuses. The radio documentary won the prestigious George Polk Award in 1998 and helped raise awareness of the environmental crisis in the Niger Delta. The documentary is an example of the countless stories highlighted by Goodman in her career to bring the facts to the public and environmentalists so people can take action to change the currents in the tides of the environmental movement.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.


 

PIELC 2015 to Feature Malia Akutagawa

EUGENE, Ore. –(December 30, 2014)– Malia Akutagawa will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Malia Akutagawa is an Assistant Professor of Law with both the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s William S. Richardson School of Law and Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge.

Malia AkutagawaMalia is part of Hui ʻĀina Momona, a consortium of scholars throughout the university community charged with addressing compelling issues of indigenous Hawaiian knowledge and practices, including the legal regime and Native Hawaiian rights associated with mālama ʻāina, and with focus on cross-disciplinary solutions to natural and cultural resource management, sustainability, and food security.

She has served in many various outlets, from Director of the Molokai Rural Development Project, to staff attorney with the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation where she worked on Hawaiian access, gathering, burial, land use and water rights cases.

Malia coordinated the 1993 Molokai Subsistence Study which served as the impetus for passage of Act 271 by the Hawaiʻi State Legislature in 1994 allowing for the designation of “community-based subsistence fishing areas” and a successful pilot project run by Hawaiian Homesteaders of Hui Mālama O Mo`omomi of an important traditional subsistence fishery on Molokai’s northwest shore.

Malia’s work focuses on the integration of Hawaiian traditional ecological knowledge and best practices into natural resource management at the local level and in collaboration with government. She has presented testimony as an invited panelist before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs’ Oversight Hearing on Impacts of Environmental Changes on Treaty Rights, Traditional Lifestyles, and Tribal Homelands.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


PIELC 2015 to Feature Celebrated Writer Gary Nabhan

EUGENE, Ore. –(December 16, 2014)— The Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon on March 5 – 8, 2015, will feature writer and conservationist Gary Nabhan as a keynote speaker.

Gary-by-Dennis-Moroney-225x300Gary Paul Nabhan is an award-winning writer of nature, farming and food essays, a pioneer in the collaborative conservation movement, and a proponent of conserving the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity. He serves as the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona Southwest Center. By promoting a holistic view of cultural and ecologic interactions, Gary has helped forge “the radical center” for collaborative conservation among farmers, ranchers, indigenous peoples, and environmentalists in the West.

As author or editor of twenty-four books, Gary has explored many issues at the nexus of food, ecology, and conservation. 2013’s Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land educates farmers on how to adapt agricultural practices to the increasingly arid landscapes brought on by climate change. 2014’s Cumin, Camels, and Caravans: A Spice Odyssey tracks the historical relationship between the spice trade and culinary imperialism. 2014’s Stitching the West Back Together: Conservation of Working Landscapes explores collaborative conservation opportunities for the West’s varied landowners and stakeholders to conserve large swaths of habitat across multiple jurisdictions.

The Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, now in its 33rd year, is the world’s premier gathering of activists, attorneys, scientists, and concerned citizens committed to protecting the environment. Volunteers of Land Air Water, a student environmental law society at the University of Oregon School of Law, are the sole organizers of the Conference. Each day of the Conference culminates with keynote presentations from preeminent activists, scientists, politicians, and authors.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.


 2015 Public Interest Environmental Law Conference to Feature Helen Slottje as a Keynote Speaker

EUGENE, Ore. –(Nov. 19, 2014)– Helen Slottje will give a keynote presentation at the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon.

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Helen Slottje and her husband David Slottje are the architects of New York’s local fracking ban strategy. By using a clause in the state constitution that empowers municipalities to make their own local land use decisions, Helen and David successfully helped over 200 communities in New York say no to natural gas hydraulic fracturing.

The Slottjes formed the Community Environmental Defense Council (CEDC) in 2009 to coordinate their efforts against fracking. Through that organization, the Slottjes have provided thousands of hours of pro-bono legal representation throughout New York. The legal strategy used by the Slottjes and CEDC relies on the “home rule” doctrine, a legal principle that prioritizes local community rights over the benefits of a single private property owner. CEDC believes that citizens have a right to insist that the community’s interest come before the shareholder’s profits, and that communities have the right to refuse to allow industry to hide behind the call for profits while polluting water, air and natural resources.

In April of 2014, Helen was chosen as the North American recipient of the Goldman Environmental Prize. Helen and David not only continue their work with New York municipalities but also travel across the country to spread their pioneering legal strategy with other communities under attack from the gas industry.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.