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“Changing Currents” expresses an awareness that the physical currents of our planet are shifting and that we must alter our human patterns to adapt for a better future. Actions of the past set in motion the drastic changes we are experiencing today. At the same time our actions today will deeply affect our world’s future. The currents that drive our climate system are changing and causing unprecedented changes to human and biotic communities across the globe. But, armed with an awareness of these changes, we can mobilize the social currency needed to change currents and set humanity on the path to resiliency. This year’s conference will provide an opportunity to challenge each other and discuss solutions and strategies for how we may move forward in confronting the world of today with an eye towards tomorrow’s reality.
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PIELC 2015: Changing Currents – March 5-8, 2015 – University of Oregon School of Law, Eugene, Oregon, USA

PIELC 2015 Registration Form

PIELC 2015 Panel Submission Form

PIELC 2015 Table Request Form


PIELC 2015 to Feature Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez

EUGENE, Ore. –(January 22, 2014)– Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Xiuhtezcatl Martinez is a 14-year-old environmental activist from Boulder, Colorado, who came into the world through the Aztec culture on his father’s side and environmental activism on his mother’s side. Since age six, he has been publicly speaking and advocating for real action on climate change.

Xiuhetzcatl Roske-Martinez

Xiuhtezcatl is the youth director of Earth Guardians, a non-profit environmental organization that is committed to protecting the water, air, earth, and atmosphere. He was one of the youngest speakers at the 2012 Rio+20 United Nations Summit in Rio, Brazil.

His work has taken him from advocating for climate recovery to the Supreme Court of the United States through his involvement with Our Children’s Trust (www.ourchildrenstrust.org) to working with members of the Boulder City Council and local county commissioners to encourage a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing.

Xiuhtezcatl and his brother, Itzcuauhtli Roske-Martinez, perform using original songs, rap, and dance to promote social activism, positive empowerment, and disseminate information to pass the energy forward to the next generations of concerned, caring, and creative people.

Xiuhtezcatl has helped to found International Earth Guardian Crews that work in Africa, India, Australia, Brazil, and Europe. He is passionate to spread his message of hope, inspiration, and the importance of acting now to avoid further damage to ecosystems.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.

 


PIELC 2015 to Feature Amy Goodman

EUGENE, Ore. –(Jan. 15, 2015)—Amy Goodman will give a keynote presentation at the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon March 5 – 8, 2015.

A widely renowned independent journalist, Amy Goodman is host and executive producer of Democracy Now! Amy co-founded Democracy Now! in 1996 after over a decade of work with Pacifica Radio station WBAI of New York City.

DSC_8091Goodman is dedicated to reporting issues that corporate media chooses to ignore or marginalize. Her work informs activists and the public with critical intelligence about the array of environmental crises of today. In her words, Democracy Now! fills a “huge niche” created by mainstream media’s “knowing so little about so much.” Democracy Now! regularly covers issues related to climate change and the climate movement.

As an investigative journalist, Goodman produced the documentary “Drilling and Killing: Chevron and Nigeria’s Oil Dictatorship” about a conflict between the military and protestors of Nigeria and Chevron’s environmental and human rights abuses. The radio documentary won the prestigious George Polk Award in 1998 and helped raise awareness of the environmental crisis in the Niger Delta. The documentary is an example of the countless stories highlighted by Goodman in her career to bring the facts to the public and environmentalists so people can take action to change the currents in the tides of the environmental movement.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.


 

PIELC 2015 to Feature Malia Akutagawa

EUGENE, Ore. –(December 30, 2014)– Malia Akutagawa will give a keynote presentation at Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, held at the University of Oregon.

Malia Akutagawa is an Assistant Professor of Law with both the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s William S. Richardson School of Law and Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge.

Malia AkutagawaMalia is part of Hui ʻĀina Momona, a consortium of scholars throughout the university community charged with addressing compelling issues of indigenous Hawaiian knowledge and practices, including the legal regime and Native Hawaiian rights associated with mālama ʻāina, and with focus on cross-disciplinary solutions to natural and cultural resource management, sustainability, and food security.

She has served in many various outlets, from Director of the Molokai Rural Development Project, to staff attorney with the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation where she worked on Hawaiian access, gathering, burial, land use and water rights cases.

Malia coordinated the 1993 Molokai Subsistence Study which served as the impetus for passage of Act 271 by the Hawaiʻi State Legislature in 1994 allowing for the designation of “community-based subsistence fishing areas” and a successful pilot project run by Hawaiian Homesteaders of Hui Mālama O Mo`omomi of an important traditional subsistence fishery on Molokai’s northwest shore.

Malia’s work focuses on the integration of Hawaiian traditional ecological knowledge and best practices into natural resource management at the local level and in collaboration with government. She has presented testimony as an invited panelist before the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs’ Oversight Hearing on Impacts of Environmental Changes on Treaty Rights, Traditional Lifestyles, and Tribal Homelands.

Changing Currents: the 33rd Annual Public Interest Environmental Law Conference will take place March 5-8, 2015, at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org.


PIELC 2015 to Feature Celebrated Writer Gary Nabhan

EUGENE, Ore. –(December 16, 2014)— The Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon on March 5 – 8, 2015, will feature writer and conservationist Gary Nabhan as a keynote speaker.

Gary-by-Dennis-Moroney-225x300Gary Paul Nabhan is an award-winning writer of nature, farming and food essays, a pioneer in the collaborative conservation movement, and a proponent of conserving the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity. He serves as the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Food Systems at the University of Arizona Southwest Center. By promoting a holistic view of cultural and ecologic interactions, Gary has helped forge “the radical center” for collaborative conservation among farmers, ranchers, indigenous peoples, and environmentalists in the West.

As author or editor of twenty-four books, Gary has explored many issues at the nexus of food, ecology, and conservation. 2013’s Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land educates farmers on how to adapt agricultural practices to the increasingly arid landscapes brought on by climate change. 2014’s Cumin, Camels, and Caravans: A Spice Odyssey tracks the historical relationship between the spice trade and culinary imperialism. 2014’s Stitching the West Back Together: Conservation of Working Landscapes explores collaborative conservation opportunities for the West’s varied landowners and stakeholders to conserve large swaths of habitat across multiple jurisdictions.

The Public Interest Environmental Law Conference, now in its 33rd year, is the world’s premier gathering of activists, attorneys, scientists, and concerned citizens committed to protecting the environment. Volunteers of Land Air Water, a student environmental law society at the University of Oregon School of Law, are the sole organizers of the Conference. Each day of the Conference culminates with keynote presentations from preeminent activists, scientists, politicians, and authors.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.


 2015 Public Interest Environmental Law Conference to Feature Helen Slottje as a Keynote Speaker

EUGENE, Ore. –(Nov. 19, 2014)– Helen Slottje will give a keynote presentation at the Public Interest Environmental Law Conference 2015: Changing Currents, held at the University of Oregon.

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Helen Slottje and her husband David Slottje are the architects of New York’s local fracking ban strategy. By using a clause in the state constitution that empowers municipalities to make their own local land use decisions, Helen and David successfully helped over 200 communities in New York say no to natural gas hydraulic fracturing.

The Slottjes formed the Community Environmental Defense Council (CEDC) in 2009 to coordinate their efforts against fracking. Through that organization, the Slottjes have provided thousands of hours of pro-bono legal representation throughout New York. The legal strategy used by the Slottjes and CEDC relies on the “home rule” doctrine, a legal principle that prioritizes local community rights over the benefits of a single private property owner. CEDC believes that citizens have a right to insist that the community’s interest come before the shareholder’s profits, and that communities have the right to refuse to allow industry to hide behind the call for profits while polluting water, air and natural resources.

In April of 2014, Helen was chosen as the North American recipient of the Goldman Environmental Prize. Helen and David not only continue their work with New York municipalities but also travel across the country to spread their pioneering legal strategy with other communities under attack from the gas industry.

PIELC 2015: Changing Currents will take place March 5 – 8, 2015 at the University of Oregon School of Law in Eugene, Oregon. More information can be found at www.pielc.org. For media inquiries, please contact askpielc@uoregon.edu.